Moving to Shenzhen, pt. 1: of authenticating, emailing, and waiting.

We're moving to China in the fall! International adventure, here we come! We have been surprised how much we miss traveling overseas–after all, the last year has seen us move cross country, make road trips to Las Vegas and San Francisco, and explore a fair bit of Utah. Living and traveling in a different country simply stimulates the adventure gland in a way that exploring at home doesn't. Thus, when the chance to work overseas came again, we were happy to take it.

Here's what is going on with our move. After I, Shon, accepted the position in Shenzhen, I had to e-mail a variety of documents to the school's Human Resources department. Those include some obvious ones like a CV and letters of reference, but also some which aren't so typical for your average USA job. Those include copies of passports for the whole family, marriage and birth certificates, a criminal background check (normal for a teacher, after all), medical checkup forms, and a copy of my highest college degree. Oh, plus notarized Chinese translations of the marriage and birth certificates. And a signed statement that I'll abide by Chinese laws and be a decent person. A number of those documents have to be authenticated, as well.

We learned back in 2012 how to go about authenticating documents. Here's the process. First, we take original documents (in the case of the degree, my notary made a photocopy and then indicated that it was a copy of the original) and have them notarized by local officials. The next step in the process is to take the notarized copy (in the case of the degree) to the county Clerk of Court and have that person indicate that the notary is, in fact, legitimate, and sign and seal this statement. Now that document goes to the State Capitol, where the Secretary of State applies the State Seal. After that, the document is then ready to go to Washington, D.C., where it is again stamped by the US Secretary of State. After all that, it has to go to the Embassy of whatever country (the UAE in 2012, China this year) where the document gets its final stamp. The local step is usually free; the state level costs a little bit (usually $10), and the national level costs more. The Embassy charges, too. Since we don't live anywhere near Washington, D.C., we use a courier service (ProEx, the same one we used before) to tote our documents from one place to another, which greatly reduces the amount of time it takes for everything to be completed. As you might imagine, all those fees add up.

Oh, and yeah, we've had to get things re-authenticated, because the Chinese Embassy requires documents to be freshly done–it didn't matter that we'd already had this done five years ago and could furnish those proven documents. In the case of the criminal background check, I must admit that this makes sense, but as for the other documents, well, it seems like a simple way to generate revenue, doesn't it? However, be that as it may, having things authenticated again is necessary, so we bit the bullet and did everything over again. I say "did," but I mean "are doing," as we are still waiting for documents to return from D.C.

Here's a list of the documents that we're having authenticated, as well as the way those fees add up.

-Local and state level notarizations for marriage certificate and background check: $40 (approximate; I forgot how much my background check cost to obtain)
-DC notarization & authentication of degree $70.00;
-US Dept. of State authentication of 3 documents $24.00;
-Embassy of China legalization of 5 documents $125.00;
-ProEx service fee and FedEx shipping: $205.

Grand total: $464. Not at all cheap, right? Like I said, though, that's just how it is. While we're on the topic of money, if you add in the $120 fee for notarized translations, we've got a total of $584. That $120 was a marvelous bargain, by the way. Ah, and I seem to have forgotten that it cost money to mail our stuff to ProEx, too–that was around $40.  So we're well over the $600 mark.

What will happen next is that we send scans of all this stuff along with previously e-mailed documents to HR in China. Then the Shenzhen government will issue an official invitation letter, and I will take that letter to the Chinese Embassy along with our passports, and apply for a work visa. At least, that's the basics of it.

We'll have to DHL a few original documents to China, too, which is interesting. Regarding the other documents, we'll have to take all the originals along when we relocate.

At this point, we simply wait for paperwork to be finished up in order that we may continue the process I outlined above. None of it is really that hard. It can, however, be stressful, and that tends to be compounded by the bureaucratic hassle (this sort of paperwork epitomizes bureaucracy, with requirements being very specific, even for reference letters) and expectations that are sometimes unclear with HR. So, we mutter in exasperation, shrug the shoulders, and do things again. During the waiting, I've actually had plenty of things to do–emailing things already emailed, for example; obtaining letters of reference with wording in just such a fashion conforming to particular guidelines, and so forth. Who ever said waiting around is boring?