More Dubai: Mondial 2012

It’s supposed to be Money Monday.  And I’ll find a way to make this work: I’ll talk about the price of admission for this nifty event we attended today.

Anyway, on the the subject.  Today’s recreational event: go to Dubai.  To do this, we have to find our way past at least two closed roads to SkyDive Dubai, within sight of the Palm Jumeirah, which is hosting the Mondial 2012 world parachuting championships.  Our agenda is simple enough: watch skydivers from all over the world compete.  What we end up doing instead is watching them practice their formations on the ground and pack their chutes.  While this is kind of interesting, there isn’t anyone actually coming down in parachutes.  So we hang out and talk for a while, and basically do a bit of baking in the sun.  ‘Cause it’s still pretty hot.  Shorts weather, easily.  And finally, after what seems like forever, we almost leave when there’s still no parachutists descending.  Our friends, Frank and Melissa, who have their baby in tow, are getting restless, and so are we.  “Let’s wait five minutes,” I say, hoping, but quite doubtfully, that we might yet get to see some action.  And then, as we are on the verge of leaving, to our delight, the distance championship event begins.

In the Air Chutist1 Duo Windsock Sign

Here’s what it’s like: you’re standing in the sun, a tad too warm, the sun blazing right at the point that the plane has just dropped sky divers from.  That makes it hard to see them, because you’re squinting and covering your eyes.  But you can see them, nonetheless, even though you’ve scrunched your face up like a kid who just sampled his first lemon.  And you watch as they gently float along the air currents, turning now and then.  Then one of them, a bit lower than the others, kicks up his feet and tugs on the lines, and he leans forward, the leading edge of the parachute tilting, and he picks up speed like mad.  You hear the speed, the sizzling of air cut by the parachutist and his canopy, and then he’s skimming the pool in front of you, before he pulls up at the end of it to try to gain some height and fly the greatest distance possible before he touches the ground.

Now, in between all of this boredom and drama, we decide it’s high time to grab some lunch.  There’s a camel tethered near the gate, on display for tourists like us (and like the Asian skydivers who were posing and photographing each other next to it when we arrived).  It’s keeper, an old Emirati guy wearing a tan kandora, spies the beast spread his legs a little and start urinating.  What’s the old fellow do?  He goes over and sticks his hand under the stream, cups it, and lifts it to his face.  “What’s he doing?”  Asks Melissa.  “Is he smelling it?” says Frank.  “I don’t know,” I say, but I have my suspicions.  We can see more clearly the next time he does it.  Yup.  He’s drinking the urine.  It is like a horrific car accident–you can’t take your eyes off it, it’s so terrible.  Sadly, or fortunately, in Jenia’s opinion, we are too far away to capture this singular act on film.  Anyway, the women making repelled faces and Frank and I wearing rather more intrigued ones, we we make our way to the dining hall.  And when we get there, we end up, quite by accident, with front row seats for a stunt show by a young Polish motorcyclist named Rafal who goes by the moniker Stunter13.

Our friends were posing for a lovely shot with this camel, well before the urine drinking took place, when suddenly he started sneezing.  Melissa was a little taken aback.

Now, allow me a switch to the past tense as I finish up.

There were also BMX stunt riders and a motocross team on hand doing hourly shows. At one point there was a standing invitation to go take a leap from a tower into a huge airbag below.  Would’ve done it, but by that time we were all ready to go.

Oh, I forgot to mention the part about money.  Want to guess the asking price? All of this was entirely free.

Tired of baking in the sun, regardless of the nifty stuff going on, we moved on to the huge Mall of the Emirates to eat a real meal (because there wasn’t much available at the Mondial) and enjoy some air conditioning.  Thank goodness for technology, and particularly for navigation systems, because Dubai’s roads are nothing if not confusing, and several were closed so we had to take more circuitous routes.

Russian Team

The Russian team enjoys the sunshine while packing their ‘chutes.

For some video of the parachutists and the motorcycles stunt show, click here: (I shot it myself, using that dandy iPhone of mine).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0P2jiPKghYE

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Camels in Trucks

Camels in trucks are not an uncommon sight here.  Here’s one we captured on whatever the digital version of film is recently.

Notice the camel…

The camel was quite interested in his surroundings.

We drove past a bigger truck loaded with no less than three of these guys, all of whom seemed quite thrilled to be going for a ride.  Unfortunately, the best picture we could get did not show them clearly.

I hear, by the way, that a camel is worth, on average, around 1 million AED (that’s approximately $250,000, if you need the conversion provided).  That might explain why this one is so tightly secured in the bed of the Toyota.  Just in case you were wondering.

Peace.

Shon and Jenia

 

 

Camel Farm Pictorial

Pj and students heading for the camels.

A student and a young (2 year old) camel.

Petting the camel.

Posing with my students Ali and Hamed.

Pj becoming a snooker player.

Here we pose holding a realistic looking plastic rifle. The boys put on a show for us with the guns, twirling them and doing a dance later.

You’ll notice a few things from the photos.  The color of the sky, for instance, accurately reflects the color (or lack thereof) that is normal for August and September here.  It’s now the 27th, and today was the first day that I can remember actually seeing the sun beating down from a clear, blue sky, with visible clouds spread about.

The camel ride was a great experience.  While we didn’t get to take the reigns, we did get quite a good walk being led about.  I’ll try to get some more photos from Pj’s camera and share them.  The farm is a good distance into the desert and past the Al Ain oasis, so it was neat just to drive out there.  Seeing all the camels was cool, and we got a true cultural experience, as I mentioned a couple posts ago.

I had at least four, perhaps five, rounds of tea or coffee with the menfolk.  We sat on the surprisingly comfortable carpet arrangement you can see behind Pj and me in the last photo above.

We didn’t get home until 10:30pm, and we were bushed by then.

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