Noise.

Big city life is noisy, right? So is country life, but in its own way, you might say. And you’d be right. I never knew how many weird noises cows make before moving to rural Georgia, after all. Big city noises are different, though. The unceasing clatter and din of human beasts. Traffic. Construction. Demolition. Reconstruction. Jackhammers.

In Shenzhen, there’s hardly a day goes by without the obnoxious racket of a jackhammer. There is a construction site adjacent to our residence–everyday for months they’ve been excavating there, cutting and drilling and slamming out rock so they can erect another skyscraper. Are you familiar with that process? Huge hydraulic breakers are employed to do the job, mounted on large crawler tractors. They repeatedly send a heavy chisel point into the rock. Eventually an excavator comes along and digs out the debris, whereupon a dump truck hauls it off. As you can imagine, it’s a loud and drawn out process.

Last week, a crew started demolishing the vacant Longzhu Hospital which is just across the road on the other side of our domicile. Now the clamor of jackhammers and breakers echoes off Tanglang Mountain from that direction, too.

There’s no relaxing outside in the beautiful fall weather because it’s so loud all the time. Even relaxing on the balcony is unrealistic. Luckily, after 6:30pm all is quiet.

Unless, that is, the road is being torn up so a sewage line can be replaced. Or they’re paving the other road.

Bearing all this in mind, when Jenia and I spent the night at the fantastic new Hard Rock Hotel in Longhua, some 45-60 minutes away, I was delighted that it was located in Mission Hills, where a posh golf course exists, and where things must surely be quieter.

Imagine my dismay when I was awakened on the 15th floor by the noise of what appears to be a metro line under construction. The entire median separating the highway was a big work zone. Curses.

But that’s all part of the deal with Shenzhen. It is a really big city, after all. Much of the construction really does make life better, ultimately, but it’s a drawback to living here as well.

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Impressions: Shenzhen After 4 Weeks

In lieu of a straightforward narrative per the usual, here’s a post that aims simply to catch the feelings of some recent moments. Some paragraphs are present tense, some past, so don’t get all English teachery about it. It’s about emotion.

Dafeng Oil Painting Village: Man, most of these rip-offs/copies of other people’s work are actually not even good. Low-caliber. Also, this whole street reeks of sewage. But where are the bathrooms? This toddler needs to pee! No luck with a bathroom. A while later: look, there’s a local mom holding her son in the air, buck naked, over a diaper so he can do his business (again, judging by the state of the diaper).

Princess at Dafeng

Princess doesn’t care that this is a low-caliber knock off. She likes it.

Walmart: no thanks. Holy too-packed-for-me, Batman!

Electric buses used everywhere in SZ for public transportation are made by BYD (who has a factory in California now). Slick! Quiet, modern, nice. The buses also have English announcements, making using them painless for foreigners like us.

More cloudy days than not. Glimpses of blue skies and rare clear days. I’m enjoying one of these on my balcony now, sweating like a stuck pig, but thrilled with the sun beaming down on me.

Clouds keep the heat down.

Buddhist (i.e. Vegetarian) restaurants and Muslim (i.e. halal) noodle places. Who knew?

Curse those wretched silent electric bikes which disregard all rules. Sidewalks, opposite traffic lanes, you name it, they go there. Royally irritating. Can’t let your guard down while walking, and especially not with little ones.

Curse also the miserable excuse for a human who decided to start putting durian into all manner of otherwise delectable foods. Breads, ice creams, you name it. If it’s yellow, watch out.

Speaking of durian, why in the whole world would anyone ever want to eat it? It is the most sense-confusing fruit ever–the nose says, “Hey, that’s going to be sweet!” and the tastebuds, caught off guard, say “Holy unexpected crap, this tastes like rotten onions!” If at first it’s not revolting, try and try again.

Walked into a restaurant. Evidently they were using Szechuan spices as they prepared something. Whole family felt vaguely pepper sprayed and started coughing uncontrollably (but not severely).

Best mango ever! Huge and, oh, words can’t express how soft and sweet.

Breakfast

Delicious–fresh mango and a Cantonese breakfast food called chong fen (pork excluded, of course).

Risky business, making an order for food. Being vegetarian adds a serious layer of challenge to eating out.

Spying a toddler clad in split pants, Turtle points and laughs. “Hahaha! Mom, look! You can see his butt!”

Fuquing St.

Sometimes you need to laugh a little.

People slap themselves while exercising. They also walk backwards.

There are eye exercises at school, wherein pupils shut and then rub their eyes in various patterns.

“That’s called the Beijing bikini,” says a coworker, as I point out the guy walking past our bus wearing his T-shirt rolled up so everyone can see his jiggling waist. This style of dress is common.

Style? It’s all over the place. From none to wow, there’s something for everyone.

Bentley. Porsche. Tesla. Maserati. Those with wealth flaunt it.

Caddy in Nanshan

Cadillac is well represented in the area.

Yeah, it gets crowded. Mornings are less busy.

You could get mowed down in a crosswalk. Keep your eyes open–not just for cars, also for the jerk on the e-bike I mentioned earlier.

I’ve only seen one automobile accident. How is it possible, given the way these people drive? “There’s a rhythm to it,” says another coworker, describing the near-chaotic traffic. “It seems to be about occupying the space,” my coworker continues. “If you’re there first, you can have it, and if you turn and get partly there, then other drivers will yield to you.”

Amazing architecture.

Ping An IFC

Newly completed, Ping An International Finance Center reaches 599 meters into the sky, making it the world’s fourth tallest building. It comes within about 10 meters of being the third tallest and is indeed impressive.

Chegongmiao

Outside the Chegongmio metro stop there are a number of impressive buildings.

Dafeng Houses

These buildings in Dafeng Oil Painting Village suggest the massive growth that’s taken place in the last thirty or forty years.

Mall interiors that defy logic. Why the devil isn’t there an escalator right here, with all the others, to get down a single floor?

Windows that get opened and left open for no reason, including while air conditioning is running.

Noise.

People often shout when they talk.

Shoddy workmanship.

Tropical vegetation. Lush.

Banyan 1

That banyan tree blew my mind. The dude outside started examining it when I aimed my camera up.

Shopping for big items isn’t easy without a car.

Buying food is cheap, unless you opt for the high-end stuff. It’s possible to spend a lot if you’ve gotta have all the same stuff as you do at home. Also, cooking is a hassle when you can’t get all the same stuff as home (and you aren’t versed in Chinese foods).

Banks take forever. Under no circumstances change money at Bank of China. Just leave your cash at home (or swap it in HK at the airport’s forex) and use the friggin’ ATM. Jenia’s going to write an entire post about this.

Korean food

22 kwai (if memory serves) buys a delightful Korean dish (kimchi fried rice), plus water and appetizers are free.

What a modern and efficient subway system. It actually is a pleasure to use.

It really is possible to eat out for less than it is to cook at home. Quality varies.

 

 

 

 

 

One Week In

Ask any teacher and he or she will tell you: the first two weeks of classes are always pretty good. Students behave well as they learn the rules and expectations of a new teacher, and they’re normally not prone to testing the boundaries. The first weeks are, therefore, the easiest of the year. And what is it like in Shenzhen, China, after one week with Chinese eleventh graders?

Not bad.

The only aggravations are of a sort easily dismissed. They’re a result of the power in the office going out without warning periodically (I hope that grade book autosaved…oh, snot, it didn’t); the internet not always working properly, and a lack of wifi in the office. Oh, and there’s a bit of disorganization, which would probably have driven me nuts if I hadn’t been through worse before. For example, the English text books we are supposed to be using this term to help students firm up their language fundamentals only arrived yesterday, and further, it was unclear which classes were expected to use which books. As it turns out, grade 11 students will use a book called Interchange, while others at a higher level will use one called Know More English, the title of which seems a questionable play on words to me. One might have expected to know this stuff ahead of time, but ultimately, it’s not a big deal.

One fantastic thing about teaching where I am is that I get lots of prep periods. There is time to get organized, time to gather materials, and time to grade student work. There is actually enough time in the workday to get my work done. That’s huge. Last year, though I loved my job in Utah, I took work home every weekend. And not a little–hours worth of work. I didn’t have a spare moment at work, never mind actually being able to enjoy my entire weekend. Here, I have time again. It’s splendid.

I’ve found Chinese students to be more or less like students anywhere. There is a great deal of variation in capabilities–or rather desire, I suspect–between streams. Yep, students in this school are streamed according to ability. I have two classes which are higher level English learners, and one which is very low. The ones in the lower class tend to be unmotivated, as you might expect, so I have to wake sleepers and prod those who aren’t taking their work seriously. Oh, about sleepers–this is a boarding school where students are kept working until 9:00 at night, so that’s one reason they nod off. They’re legitimately tired, not just uninterested.

Yesterday left me with a smile on my face, for it was Teacher’s Day. As the day wore on, students brought me a box of apples, two big bouquets, chocolate, a couple of hand-written notes, and some fancy soap. In the evening, there was a banquet staged for all of us teachers, too, at some fancy restaurant, but it turned out my little ones weren’t welcome, so I skipped it. After all, who wants to go to a teacher’s day banquet where teachers’ families aren’t welcome?

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Gifts for teacher’s day.

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Traffic jam upon leaving. Note people walking in middle of road. The white Mazda is partly in the wrong lane.

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Note the smiles and the flowers on the bus.

Another point of interest is the end of the school day at a boarding school on Friday. Since most of the English teachers live at a different location, we ride a bus to and from school. Yesterday, we sat in traffic–not even able to get out of the school gates–for almost 20 minutes because the students were going home. The kids rolled their carry-on sized luggage out the gates and along the sidewalk to a car sitting in the road waiting for them. It was a big of an exodus, and quite interesting to witness. Hopefully, though, our bus can make a quicker escape hereafter.

If things continue in this vein, I’ll be very pleased to be working in Shenzhen. Here’s hoping the first week is a harbinger of what is to come, not merely the honeymoon period.