How to Shop in Hong Kong

The headline should read, “How to Shop in Tuen Mun,” actually. You see, there’s no experience quite like making a little pilgrimage from Shenzhen to Hong Kong’s Tuen Mun neighborhood. This is a convenient little trip–one need only go to the Shenzhen Bay Checkpoint, and after crossing the border, it’s a cinch to hop a bus (the City Bus operated B3X) which terminates right in front of a shopping mall. The bus ride is a mere 20 minutes duration, and the double decker bus accommodates over 100 people.

Accordingly, this is a popular day trip for Chinese nationals in pursuit of goods not as easily or perhaps as cheaply picked up in Mainland China. The Shenzhen Bay Checkpoint has a reputation around here for being quicker than others–take the Futian crossing, for example, which is always crowded–but timing is very important with the Shenzhen Bay crossing.

Saturday we set off for HK via SZ Bay, arriving at the border around 9:15 am. We had a great day mapped out: watch The Last Jedi, then do some Christmas shopping. Based on our last trip, we’d be at the Town Plaza Mall, where the bus drops people off, in roughly an hour. But it didn’t go quite that quickly. Crossing the border took forever–it looked like every other person in Shenzhen was heading the same direction, all with wheeled luggage in tow. Wheeled luggage–the kind you take on a multi-night trip somewhere. Lots of travelers, I observed.

In terms of avoiding crowds, it seems 9:15 am was exactly the worst time to go. After waiting with toddler in carrier, back starting to ache quite thoroughly, for about an hour, we got through both passport checks. Much to our chagrin, where the previous time we’d been, there had been a line to the B93X bus that wasn’t terribly long, today was different. The line basically reached to the point you emerge from the border checkpoint building. Now they load those buses up quickly–two at a time, almost constantly departing, and that enables the queue to keep moving. However, one small hassle is the lack of signage. Sure, you can join the line easily, but how much will a ticket cost? That’s only posted down by the bus. So we had to make a little trek down there to find out. $11 HKD is the price, in case you’re wondering, and $5.50 for the 4 year old. We had that much cash, so no problem. Next, we headed back to the rear of the line, and being the sort of obedient Westerners we are, joined the queue there. Or, ok, maybe we merged into the general melee sort of near the back. Come on, we’d been there as long as anyone else, having made a mostly unnecessary trip to the front, so cut us some slack. Anyhow, this line didn’t move nearly as fast as before, but we finally ended up in a bus, and in the best seats in the house– the front, on the top.

This position gave us an excellent view of the nifty right-side-of-the-road to left-side-of-the-road switcheroo engineered into the highway. China drives on the right, same as the US, and HK on the left, so the transition seems like it would be awkward, but courtesy of a little loop and swoop, it’s easy as pie.

It was 11:30 before we arrived at the mall, which seemed an awfully long time. A handful of people had disembarked before the final stop, but most took their luggage and hopped out. We made for the movie theater, spent too much money on oily popcorn (I declined both the wasabi and tomato flavored options), and enjoyed seeing Star Wars on its opening weekend.

Afterward, we joined the hordes of people who’d thronged the mall. And as it turns out, the throngs we’d shared floor space with like human cattle at SZ Bay border crossing weren’t going away for the weekend. They were going shopping. The suitcases were for their purchases. You’d have thought you were on the concourse at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport, there were so many people rolling luggage around.

It looked like suitcase parking outside Yves St Lauren, which didn’t allow folks to haul the things into the store.

As luck would have it, our return trip also coincided with the returning time of thousands of other people, and we found ourselves again in a humongous line back into China. I can tell you the worst time to return from Tuen Mun is nightfall because that’s when everyone else is also heading home. A little earlier, however, around 4:30pm, and the border is a snap. We finished both HK and China inside 25 minutes on our previous journey.

As for those suitcases, everyone was just whizzing them home. “I wonder about customs?” We mused, as we watched everyone roll their stuff blithely past the customs line. Turns out, according to this article on the website China Highlights, you’d have to buy quite a lot of stuff to have any taxes levied. Guess the suitcases are just an ingenious way of carrying your loot easily. So it turns out the best way to shop in Hong Kong is to hop a bus at the border, roll your wheeled luggage along, and fill it with goodies at the mall.

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