Airfare Update IV

Okay, I must give it to ADEC.  They’ve come through.  Although it was an entire 3 months late, they’ve credited my wife and child’s airfare allowance into this month’s pay.  Granted, we can make the case that they’re contractually obliged to give us this money and it is supposed to be prior to traveling, not afterward.  But regardless, we’re glad to have it (and also glad that we had enough money to cover our own tickets during the summer holidays, or we’d have been stuck in Al Ain).

This means that despite being late, as regards pay (except that raises have been frozen during the last two years) ADEC has always come through.

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A Scene from France

The baby is asleep in his Graco car seat. The wife and I share bits of conversation as the miles (excuse me, kilometers, for we’re in France) drift lazily past. We haven’t gotten to the interstate highway yet, and I don’t think we will. It’s become increasingly obvious that those green signs with white letters that clearly pointed toward Luxembourg in the center of Reims weren’t indicating the most direct route.

Pop music plays on the radio until we get tired of it and switch it off. Most of the songs are in English, and it’s nice to turn the dial and be able to find any number of radio stations playing music that is comprehensible to the average Western ear.

We zip from one small town to another. The speed limit’s not posted, but the other cars on the two-lane road seem to be moving about 100 kph, so that’s where I keep it, more or less. Sometimes the road gets rough, the faded blacktop mottled with pockmarks, and I slow, and at one of these points a guy in a heavy black BMW sedan who’s been behind me for a while blows past. I wonder how he can move so fast on this rough pavement and not be endangering himself and his passengers.

The sun comes out for a little while just as we leave another of the villages, and as the gray clouds peel back to expose blue sky, we marvel at the beauty of the gently rolling hills that stretch out until the eye can see no more to either side. There are pastures and recently cut wheat fields in shades of gold and green. Monolithic windmills spin slowly in the gentle breeze, and farmhouses and barns perch picturesquely in the distance.

The French countryside somewhere along a rural road between Rheims and Luxembourg.

The vast and lovely French countryside.

“I know why Van Gogh found this worth painting,” I tell Jenia.

“It’s beautiful.”

Van Gogh's Wheat Field, 1888.

Van Gogh’s Wheat Field, 1888.

As we continue, the road is lined with trees on either side, trees that jut proudly upward, forming an umbrella over the road now and again. Beyond these, there are no trees to the left or right, just fields reaching out into the distance.

The Ardennes region of France, along D980, 7 km from Cauroy.

The Ardennes region of France, along D980, 7 km from Cauroy.

When we make our way slowly through a tiny town called Cauroy, there’s a community yard sale that seems to be in its final moments.

“Oh, I want to go,” Jenia says. So I take a side street that I figure will lead back to the little square, but the road instead brings us to a big shed and farm equipment. A man nearby watches us curiously. After turning around, I park beside the road and watch chickens through a fence while Jenia goes to browse the junk on sale. She comes back in 10 minutes with a couple of kitchen goods, items unique and inexpensive, nifty souvenirs.

This is because we took the long way.

Thursday List: Lessons Learned

In no particular order, allow us to present lessons we learned while we traveled this summer.  Humorous?  Maybe (or maybe not, you be the judge).  True?  We think so.

1) The Toyota Yaris is one of the worst cars ever built.  We rented one for a day in Georgia (that would be the state, not the country).  The steering had less feel and was more vague than a careless comment that could be either a compliment or an insult.  The blind spots were larger than a Ford Expedition.  The centered gauge cluster is less sensible than a drunken, raving Mel Gibson. The acres of plastic swathing the interior epitomize the notion of “cheap,” along with every other aspect of the automobile.  Also it has no power.

2) The author of the CNN article “The New London, Paris and Rome” is totally wrong about Ostend.  Ostend is boring and the beach unappealing–not “oddly restorative.”  Besides, we got locked in a Japanese garden while there.

ostend

Ostend. Bland, forgettable, and certainly not worth visiting.  Sorry Belgium.  We love some of your other cities.

3) Couchsurfing is infinitely more fun than staying in a hotel.  And couchsurfers are, as it turns out, not all hippies–they’re a varied group of interesting folks.  We stayed with a guy who works in the Belgian steel industry, two air traffic controllers, and more.  We met fellow surfers who had careers as mind-blowing as molecular modeling researcher and astrophysicist.  Not kidding.  The astrophysicist, a guy named Lorraine from France, is also a beekeeper.  He shared a story about how he was asked to deliver a beehive to the Prime Minister (all true, mind you). He said yes, of course.  “But I told them that because it is summer, if I put the beehive in the car to deliver it, it could be a problem.  Because of the heat, the bees could die.”  The person he was speaking to said, “No problem.”  “Yes,” he said, “It would be a problem.  The bees could die.”  The other person reassured him–“No, no problem.  You will not have to stop.”  He ended up having a police escort through the center of Paris so that he didn’t have to stop and wait in traffic, and he delivered the beehive and set it up at the Prime Minister’s place.

4) Traveling with a baby is not only possible, but for the most part, quite easy (and there’s a post about that in the making).  As a side note, carrying a baby in a carrier starts to hurt one’s back after a couple days (but it is notably easier than pushing a stroller all over creation).

5) We now understand our friends who told us a year ago that they were looking forward to being back in the UAE. Then, we thought they were, well, nuts. Now, we are those people, too.

6) It can be rather hard to explain to those back in the US – or the people we met during our travels – what life here is really like. It seems that there is a backstory to every story. Also, for some reason, it’s easier to tell about the negative experiences.

7) Speaking of backstories, here’s one now: just kidding.  Lesson learned when telling stories to family back home–trim the backstories to the bare minimum, or your loved ones will tune out before you get to the good stuff.

8) Strangely, following the most obvious road signs from one place to another doesn’t always yield the fastest route.  Take our trip to Reims from Luxembourg, for example: this should have been a short two hours, judging by Google Maps, but it took us no less than six hours of meandering secondary roads.

The French countryside somewhere along a rural road between Rheims and Luxembourg.

The French countryside somewhere along a rural road between Rheims and Luxembourg.

We found some great mountain roads between Luxembourg and Germany.  This was just over the German border.

We found some great mountain roads between Luxembourg and Germany. This was just over the German border.

Somewhere in France...

Somewhere in France…

9) That brings us to this point: enjoy being on the verge of lost or completely off track.  Make it a point to simply have a great time exploring.  Make the best of sore feet (an excuse to stop at that little cafe!) or winding back roads (pull over and get a photo of the picturesque mountain pass).  The single best day of our trip was when we were driving, completely by accident and thanks to the road signs, the French countryside.  And enjoy the crummy places you end up, too (within reason, of course), like Ostend.  Where else would we have ever gotten locked in a Japanese garden?  It was a memorable experience at least.

10) It’s good to come home.  We already knew this.  But what we didn’t expect was to grow tired of traveling, since we both love it.  Still, we did.  After what started to seem too long on the road, we found ourselves especially grateful to have our own space and the chance to return to our routines.

Advice (and a book on help) to New Teachers

Tonight Jenia and I attended a snazzy welcome party for new ADEC teachers at the Rotana hotel in Al Ain.  We met a few of the many new teachers on hand, and when a young lady named Kim asked for advice on how to make it here and survive the year to return for another, I told her this: “Go with the flow.  Relax.  Don’t worry about the pressure–it just doesn’t matter.  Don’t let them stress you out.”  Yeah, my biggest and best piece of advice is that pathetic.  I mean, the best I can say is “roll with it, baby?”  Pretty much, but I do emphasize the “it just doesn’t matter” part pretty heavily, too.  Generally, we Western teachers have a work ethic and such that will more than get us by here, and if we just apply what we already know and don’t allow administrators to stress us out, we’ll be solid additions to the workforce.  Oh, and, as one veteran teacher told me last year, “Take the tea” whenever it is offered by your Arab co-workers.  Go have a chat, ignore whatever work you might have for a few minutes, and be social.  That helps you build relationships, and those can be helpful (if not critical, in some cases) to succeeding at work.

One other thing that is an incalculably helpful resource–there is a group of expats called Al Ain Life (the ones that staged tonight’s get together) that has put together a truly splendid booklet offering insight into the whole residency process (how to get your electricity switched over to your name, for example), unraveling an extremely and unnecessarily complex part of settling in.  We picked up a hard copy tonight at the event, and it’s wonderful.   Al Ain Life (people we know personally, by the way) are more than happy to share a digital copy with you.  If you’re interested, comment below, and we will sort out a way to get it to you.

Sri Lanka, Part II

Since we shared the basic story of our trip to Sri Lanka in Pre-Vacation, this post is a way for us to share some photographs that we are fond of.  Each one has a story of some kind that goes with it, of course, but not all stories need to be written, for they can be guessed at, and sometimes guessing is as rewarding as knowing the actuality of a thing.

ADEC Discounts

Working for the Abu Dhabi Education Council has its perks.  Summer vacation is the main one, of course, but there are some vendors that offer discounts to ADEC teachers and employees.  And, if you missed it in one of my posts from last August (Flexible Pricing), there are vendors that take advantage of ADEC newbies and actually increase their rates (Infinity Services, if you’ll recall).

Now, for those of you who are prospective ADEC teachers, you may well be interested in what sorts of discounts that are available here in Al Ain, right?

To begin with, some furniture stores offer a discount to us.  Home Centre comes to mind.  In order to get this discount, you just need to furnish your ADEC identification (or visa, which is sponsored by ADEC, or some proof of employment with them).  If they have another sale going on, though, that will override the ADEC discount.

Most of the local hotels offer a discount to ADEC teachers for health club memberships (as well as food and drink from the mighty expensive hotel restaurants).  For example, the Danat Hotel Resort (near the Hilton) offers a 15% discount.  Some hotels actually have a welcome party event and they’ll offer deeper discounts than usual at those events, too, so keep your eyes peeled for those (the Danat has one coming up Tuesday the 11th, actually).

The Rugby Club offers a 10% discount to ADEC teachers.  They’re one of the more cost-effective places to go if you’re looking for a decent gym and pool, plus their restaurant has reasonable prices since they’re not a hotel (hotels attach very high taxes to food and drink; 16%, if I remember right–we avoid hotel eateries for that reason).

It might pay to know that Etihad Airlines offers 20% off airfare to ADEC folks.

At any rate, wherever you go, particularly if you’re looking at some kind of membership, it pays to ask if they offer an ADEC discount, because there are quite a few places that do.